Niche Market Publishing–LGBTQ and Others


My chosen market for writing is plain vanilla: I write murder mysteries with no special lifestyle twist. There is also a untold number of other writers competing with me.

One way to achieve success is to write for a niche market.

In a recent conversation, a friend said to me, “Have you considered writing man on man romances?” My answer was I hadn’t. I am not a man. My friend informed me that a segment of women writers were writing man on man love stories with financial success.

I forgot about that conversation until today. While researching the author of the Argo story, I stumbled upon an article about a publishing house owned by two women. I clicked on the link (pasted below at the end of this post) and learned that the publishers specialize in children’s books for LGBTQ families.

I was familiar with LGBT, but was uncertain what the Q was.

According to http://ok2bme.ca/meaning

LGBTQ is a short form or acronym that means:

L”esbian “G”ay “B”isexual “T”ransgender, “Q”ueer or “Q”uestioning

Once again, I was reminded that niche markets exist everywhere. One Twitter follower of mine is I. M. Telling. Telling writes stories exclusively about bi-racial sexual relationships. Another niche market.

By now, everyone knows about the success of Fifty Shades of Grey, a self-published hit in erotica that touches on specialized sexual niches. According to The Guardian, Fifty Shades “contributed to an overall rise in digital and print sales in 2012.”  Wow! How is that for the power of a niche market?

The unusual nature of the niche markets described here is to make you realize that, as an author, you can write about anything, and there is likely an audience for it. If you are finding it hard to break the financial success barrier in a plain vanilla market like mine, you may want to consider exploring a niche market for which you have an aptitude and interest.

http://twolivesbooks.wordpress.com/

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3 responses »

  1. This is excellent advice! Having worked closely with LGBTQ youth, I know there is a significant lack of age appropriate material. Transitioning from child to teenager is difficult enough – but to do it without having many literary role models is even more challenging.

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