Tag Archives: doomsday

Stockman Says The Ship Is Going Down


“Kill the Fed. Lunatics run it. Tell the generals to put their toys away. Cut the Defense budget by a third. Let the Bush tax cuts expire on everybody. Let greedy, mismanaged banks collapse. Obama’s budget is a fantasy. Let the wealthy pay a larger portion for their medicare. Start the revisions ASAP. Ron Paul was right about the Fed destroying America.”

 

CNBC was startled when its guest, former Reagan-era money man David Stockman, barraged the interviewers with the frank comments above. The TV hosts joked about throwing Stockman off the set. In essence, Stockman says the public is being lied to by banks, Congress, the Federal Reserve and its chairman Ben Bernanke, and both political parties. Without sensible change, the country faces ruin, he says.

 

Whew!

 

In an election year, it is important to take in as many facts as one can before making one’s decision. Here’s a perspective  to consider as one makes a choice for November’s election:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJ0LLi8rJZw

 

This Crazy World


As I was logging on-line this morning, a tease for a Yahoo Trending Now news item caught my eye. Once again I was shocked to see how topsy-turvy “official” thinking has become. This excerpt illustrates that reality is crazier than any fiction I could create. See if you agree:

A woman trying to feed the kids in her neighborhood during the summer may be fined for her good deed. Angela Prattis of Chester Township, outside Philadelphia, has spent the past few months handing out free lunches to the children in her community while they’re home from school for the summer break. The food, supplied by the archdiocese of Philadelphia, helps low-income residents of the township, which has a per capita income of $19,000 a year.

The city council was alerted to Prattis’s free lunches and ruled that if she continues to give away food next summer, she will need a variance or be fined $600 a day. The council says she needs a variance because she’s giving away meals in a residential area, which is a zoning violation. However, if Prattis gets a variance to distribute the food, the administrative fees would cost up to $1,000. The Chester Township City Council has agreed to allow Prattis to continue distributing food for the duration of the summer, but next summer is a whole new battle. Currently, Prattis files paperwork weekly and is visited by a state worker biweekly to ensure she is doing what she says she’s doing.

Prattis, who does not make any money on the meal distribution, says she wanted to help make sure the neighborhood kids received at least one healthy meal a day during the summer. “You have houses here. The roofs are falling in, and they could be focused on a lot more serious issues than me feeding children,” Prattis said of the city council’s ruling.

Author Vernon Vinge: On Writing, Fiction and the Singularity


Excellent interview with science fiction author Vernon Vinge

This video explores the platform of science fiction as a vehicle to advance ideas. The interview offers advice for writers, as well as thoughts about the future.

You’ve Gotta Be Kidding Me!


This post is way off topic, but I had to post it as an example of how crazy things are getting in the world. This excerpt came from www.zerohedge.com on 8/7/2012, posted at 18:37, submitted by Tyler Durden:

Last Friday, US Congressman Dennis Kucinich introduced HR 6357, a bill which aims to ‘prohibit the extrajudicial killing of United States citizens’ by the federal government. In other words, in the Land of the Free, they need to pass a law to prevent the government from indiscriminately murdering its own citizens. Now if this doesn’t  give one reason to pause and consider the distortions of liberty that have taken place in western civilization, I don’t know what will.

Response to Song Prompt “The Good Life”


I picked the song prompt “The Good Life” by Three Days Grace a couple of weeks ago and scheduled the post for the future. Afterward, I heard about a man who was traveling through Cumberland, Maryland, on whose true tale this short story is based. The person who told me about him is the cook character in the piece.

It is amazing how well this story fits the sentiment of the prompt song.  It was serendipitous I was told about this story just as the prompt song posted.

Enjoy!

The Good Life

by Fay Moore © 2012

The stranger sidled up to the lunch counter and took a seat.

The cook, who also served as waiter at the rescue mission, didn’t recognize the man as having been there before. No matter. More and more, the faces were new, coming in for a meal or two before disappearing, not to be seen again. Yet something about this man piqued the cook’s curiosity.

Would you like a bowl of soup?” the cook asked.

Yes. Thank you,” said the stranger.

He dropped his knapsack on the floor beside the counter stool, took a seat, then swiveled around to survey the room. A half-dozen wizened-faced men peppered the room, sitting at tables in dark corners. Like fly specks on an otherwise clean kitchen counter top, they were an uncomfortable reminder that something unlikable was present in this city.

I don’t think I’ve seen you here before,” remarked the cook.

No. I’m only here for a day or two.”

Where are you staying?”

At the hobo camp by the railroad yard.” The man showed no embarrassment or shame.

Hobo. Until recently, it was an archaic word that conjured the depression era men who traveled with a bindle, riding in box cars, looking for the next place that promised a chance at a job.

Hobo. Here at the mission, modern hobos arrived daily, attracted to the hobo camp near the railroad hub, where trains converged  for a re-shuffling of the cars into new configurations based on each car’s destination. Men traveling from southern or eastern cities came here to catch a western- or northern-bound train. And vice versa, depending on the season or the work available. Some were disheveled from countless days between using a bath or laundry facility.

The cook noticed this stranger was clean and cleanly dressed.

Hobo. A lifestyle of survival and of necessity exacerbated by bad economic times. Unlike bums, hobos traveled looking for work. A job yielded a good life. Modern hobos might or might not be penniless. The common characteristic hobos shared was using the railroads to travel – for free.

Are you riding the train?” the cook asked.

Hope to. I’m heading for Canada.”

Why Canada?”

For vacation,” came the reply.

You’re kidding me,” the cook gasped.

No. I guess I should explain. I used to be a hobo, always traveling from place to place by rail, trying to find work. Finally, I was lucky and landed a good job. Someone took me under his wing to guide me. I went to law school. Now I am a lawyer. But every year, I take a vacation and ride the rails. For old time’s sake, I guess.”

The cook looked incredulous.

It’s true. I have a hand written book given to me by an old man a long time ago that outlines every rail line, every yard, where the junctions are to change course, which yards to avoid because the bulls are mean sons of bitches. That kind of stuff. He collected it all by writing it down. Before he died, he gave it to me.”

Have you ever been thrown off a train by a bull?” The cook was wide-eyed.

Yes. It’s worse in the deep south. I got roughed up down there and taken to jail. But I paid my fine, and I went on my way.”

The cook shook his head. The man finished his soup and slapped a twenty dollar bill on the counter.

The lunch is free,” said the cook. “The boss says to feed whoever walks through the door.”

I know. This is a donation. It’s what I do now that I can. When I eat, I pay for myself,” he said, panning his arm across the room, “and for my friends. Thanks for being here to feed us. There was a time that without soup kitchens like this one, I would not have had a meal for days while I hunted work. It’s my way to give back.”

The stranger picked up his backpack, shouldered it, and walked out through the same door he entered earlier, without looking back. In his head, he thought about the cook. He thought each of them had found a little of the good life.

Oh, I Hope Not!


Venus transited the face of the sun recently. Amateur astronomers gathered, where weather permitted, to watch the event. Other planet gazers, the astrologers, also fixated on the event. Even the ancient Mayans noted the event.

In fact, the Mayans believed that whatever was happening in world events at the moment of the Venus eclipse would foreshadow the events to occur in December, at the end of the Mayan calendar.

A cursory search of headlines is bleak. The European economy is in tatters. Leaders seem unable to solve the nations’ problems. The union of nations, which has cemented peaceful interrelations for decades, is disintegrating. The bank crisis in Europe threatens to spread beyond Europe. China, the world’s new sovereign lender, is battling its own economic slowdown. China, Russia and India are clandestinely ganging up against the US dollar as the world reserve currency.  The mideast is forming energy alliances with Russia, by-passing historical contracts with the United States. China, Russia and central Asia intervene and discuss plans to stabilize Afghanistan. Banks and financial institutions the world over appear to be gambling with stakeholder assets without evident consequences to those making the wagers. Rather the depositors and taxpayers appear to sustain all the loss. There are less and less safe and solvent investments for individuals to use to safeguard wealth accumulation. Hyperinflation or deflation–either one is destructive. The weather is bizarre and affecting food production negatively. Water resources are inadequate for global need. Radioactive accidents in one locale spread to affect food sources of other nations. No one trusts anyone.

Does this all sound like the book outline of an international thriller? It would be a fantastic read. Maybe that’s it–the world is creating a new novel, not an uncomfortable future reality.

Oops. There I go smoking hopium again.