Tag Archives: self-promotion

Six Tips for Selling on Amazon.com


Here’s a great video from a guy who is selling books on Amazon.com himself AND helping other authors to do the same. He sells both e-books and paper books. He uses print-on-demand to print his tree books.

His video is titled “5 Tips . . .” , but he gives a bonus tip at the end that is very practical and may be the best marketing tip you’ll receive today. Hence, hang in there for the sixth tip!

5 Tips to Selling on Amazon

 

 

 

Rooting & Reproducing


Rooting & Reproducing.

The link above takes you to a very interesting discussion from heaven4earth.com on how our self-talk or self-concept molds how we set goals, accept success, or achieve. It addresses how we self-sabotage. A very Zen approach.

A related theme is told through short story by 1000 Seeds at http://onethousandseeds.com/2012/05/07/the-giant/#more-703.

I commented on the short story “The Giant” as follows:

You describe a wonderful journey. The sojourner is blind to much of it, though various guides offer to help him. It is so like us, isn’t it, to travel blind to the myriad colors of life around us. Thank you for this tale. It’s lovely.

Please check out both posts. The authors, each in his own way, offer solutions to impediments.

Share a Little Love


How timely that I should get this little note from JK Bradley this morning:

Fay, this is a great start for a story. You’ve built a nice amount of intrigue by setting up this mystery. However the voting works out, here’s what I think, you should use this story and work with it. Maybe put out 500 or so words every couple of days for your followers. It’s really good.

Nice job.

What he doesn’t know is that I will be submitting the piece to the writers group next week. I wrote it so it will stand alone as a piece of sudden fiction.

However, to keep the juices flowing, I may follow his advice. My mind loves games, and by playing along on this one, I could end up with another short story to publish. What do you think? Would you like to play along, too? You can trick yourself out of that dry spot and get a short story done to boot. We can team tag for each other.

Here’s the link — http://thebradleychronicles.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/indie-500/

Note: To boot — I say this colloquialism a lot, but never give a thought to its origins or if this is the correct spelling. I’ll have to research that little phrase.

P.S.  After a week of frosty mornings, it’s warm again. Peas, pole beans, lettuce and radishes have popped. I’m waiting on spinach, cabbage, cauliflower, beets, kale and brussel sprouts. Looks like the grapes took a hit and got frostbitten. Time will tell.

The Benefits of Tennis; Comment Tennis, That Is


Riatarded of The Uninspired Chronicles has touched a nerve. She is blogging about how an author jumpstarts writing when the author hits a wall. Many are wall-slammed it seems, seeking a solution to writer’s block. I’ve offered a couple of tips I use to Riatarded. My guess is she will put out an e-book with her collection of tips once the comment tennis game is over. It may prove to be a useful tool.

But it’s the comment tennis aspect of blogging that I want to chat about. Comment tennis (please forgive me for oversimplifying here) is the back and forth written exchanges on blogs. It is an art I am practicing. Why practice? Because I am trying to teach myself to soften my naturally very direct style.

I like getting straight to the point of a matter. I prefer to cut the chit-chat. However, I am aware that directness can equate to rudeness or sound like arrogance. So, I am trying to create a better way for Fay to communicate: I am practicing chit-chat via comments.

Second, I am an introvert forcing myself to act extroverted. Staying inside my introverted comfort zone reinforces bad habits I’ve made that obstruct free communication. To change myself in relation to others, I have to show up in another’s space. I have to get out there.

Third, good communication is an art. Reading and participating in comment tennis can teach me what works and what doesn’t. Practicing the positive forms reinforces those skills and ingrains them in my being.

It is said it takes thirty days of doing to make a new habit. When I have a lifetime of doing things a certain way, I think it’s going to take more than thirty days of practice to change it.

Advanced E- Learning


My Aussie e-friend at e-Learning Provocateur has posted a collection of blog sites for advancing one’s knowledge. As writers, we are a curious lot who love to learn new things, so we can incorporate those things into stories.

For you “already professional” authors, one of the blogs cited deals with social business on a global scale. If you are planning to take your book products outside of North America, you may glean some tips to speed your process along.

Another blog mentioned focuses on futurism and related trends. Syfy writers take note. The remaining topics covered in Provocateur’s list are vast — a true treasure trove. Check it out. Feed your head.

http://ryan2point0.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/my-15-favourite-australian-e-learning-bloggers/#comment-2004

Use the Bells and Whistles


In a previous post, I linked to Ryan Tracy’s Tips and Tricks for Self-Publishers, Part 4. His post gives some advice (learned from his own experience as an author selling on Amazon.com) for authors who have completed writing and editing and are ready to upload  a book to Amazon.com. He suggests practices to get the most out of  marketing your e-book.

I adore the simplicity of his premise: use all the bells and whistles available to you to tell the world about you and your book. Sometimes simple gimmicks make extraordinary differences. So try them.

The average e-book author who is independently published sells a mere 45 copies per title. Use Ryan’s suggestions to take yourself out of  average status into the stellar sphere. In his words:

“Another tactic I think is often overlooked is to take advantage of all the bells and whistles on your book’s profile page on Amazon. For example:

• Solicit “likes” and customer reviews.

 • Activate Look Inside the Book.

 • Upload customer images.

• Add keyword tags.

• Add book extras via Shelfari.

• Create an author page.”

In case you missed Ryan’s post the first time, you may read it in its entirety here:

http://ryan2point0.wordpress.com/2012/03/12/tips-tricks-for-self-publishers-part-4/

Social Media is Taking Over…Don’t Believe Me? Watch This Video.


If you are over 39, and you want to remain relevent in business or in a creative field, you better read Gen Y Girl Kayla Cruz’s link below. Watch the video. It is a MUST.

If you are over 39 and unemployed, you are apt to stay that way unless you embrace the way of the world. Technology is rapidly changing the way business is conducted and the way people communicate.

Finally, if you are writing a book set in 2012, you better understand modern culture. If you have your twenty- or thirty-something character spending time on e-mail  primarily using a laptop, you are so out of touch. Your credibility will be negatively affected. Or your character may be viewed as social awkward.

As a member of the over 39 club, I learn and re-learn till my head hurts.

Social Media is Taking Over…Don’t Believe Me? Watch This Video..

Why An Author Should Blog


Bestselling Author Shares 3 Tips for Building Your Blog Audience.

The link above leads to a great read for the author who hasn’t yet started a blog. It explains how a blog can help you develop an audience for your work.

In my opinion, blogging does something else. It teaches you how to interact with your readers and let’s you practice and develop those skills.

As a closet introvert, it is work for me to “act” extroverted.  I like interacting with people. That is genuine. But it takes a toll on me, whereas the real extrovert gets energized by interaction. Give and take with readers is part of being a commercially successful author.

The work of the author continues long after the book has been written and published. The role includes marketing the book. That means public speaking, book signings, and promotion, promotion, promotion. Blogging can help prepare an author for the public relations aspect of writing.

Here’s a list of interesting statistics:

  1. The average independently published author sells 45 copies per book title in a lifetime.
  2. The average traditionally published author sells 4,500 copies per book title in a lifetime.
  3. Nora Roberts sells 81 books per minute.

The explanation of the Roberts Success Formula, according to Fay, follows:

Nora Roberts writes and markets every business day from 9 to 5. She treats writing as her job, not her passion or avocation or hobby. She understands that successful selling is part of her role. Her results demonstrate that.

Successful writing is work. It is creation, re-writing, publication, marketing, and sales.

Whew. I am tired just thinking about it. Where’s my vitamin bottle? I am in training, and I’ve already got my running shoes on.