Tag Archives: using business rules to guide your writing career

Good-Bye, Simple Life


When I started this blog about writing my first novel, I had no idea of the complexities of the world of publishing and selling books. I didn’t know that the writing of the book would be the easy part.

There was a time when I read the daily blogs of many, many people, keeping up on details of their lives and projects. I enjoyed the interaction, the making of new friends. We talked about our dreams. We dreamed about telling stories that others would read and enjoy. Together–at our own pace–we put one foot in front of the other and started the Writer’s journey. We encouraged each other.

Man, I loved those times!

Then came knowledge–cover design, marketing strategies, book conferences, interacting with the media, and more. Intermingled with all of this is the grind of the re-write and editing, editing, editing.

Plus, I have work outside of writing. And family and friends who need nurturing. And it’s summer: the grass is growing; the garden needs weeding, the ants taking over my house need murdered; the animals need care and play time.

I have complicated my life–by choice–in so many ways. Even though I have given up commercial farming, there is no spare time in the schedule. In fact, I am busier than I ever was. And I am trying to get the #$%^# novel finished!

Okay. Now that I have bawled like a baby and thrown a tantrum, let me say this–I wouldn’t change a thing. Well, maybe one thing. Me. I’d change me to be better organized, less frazzled, less fearful of the unknown, more optimistic about the future. But I wouldn’t change a thing about the craziness of the book world I have embraced.

Simply said, “Good-bye, Simple Life.”

Advice I’d Give My Child


Marty Nemko is a career consultant and radio personality. Marty offers the following business advice based on conversations with thousands of persons wanting to succeed in business and life. I think the advice works for authors, too, unless your writing goal is winning the Nobel Peace Prize in literature or penning the next great classical tome. If, however, you’d like to earn enough cash to pay for your printer paper and internet fees, then listen up.

Advice I’d Give My Child

If you’re entrepreneurial, I recommend starting your own business. Yes, I know, only 20 percent of new businesses are still in business after five years, but you can beat the odds. Just remember this one rule: Don’t innovate. Replicate. Copy a successful simple business.

Writing is a business. Like it or not, it is.  So use the rules that work in the marketplace. Study writers who earn money. What are they doing? Do it. How do they market their books? Mimic their techniques in your own domain.

Look for niches that are taking off. Write for those niches. Okay, you weren’t the first to break ground.  So what? Follow the momentum and ride it. That’s what successful investors do. They don’t worry about being the first to discover the next new thing: they spot the trend, then ride it as long and high as they can.

Look. Listen. Learn. And maybe you can pay for the next ink cartridge with a royalty check.